Australian Public Sector
Anti-Corruption Conference
Independent Commission Against Corruption, New South Wales Crime and Corruption Commission, Queensland

Workshops

Registration for the full-day and half-day interactive workshops is open now. You do not need to be a conference delegate to register for an APSACC workshop.

Workshop facilitators are qualified and experienced practitioners from the NSW Independent Commission Against Corruption (ICAC), the Crime and Corruption Commission, Queensland (CCC), the NSW Ombudsman and the US Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI).

Spaces are limited to 24 participants per workshop. It is recommended that you reserve your place early to avoid disappointment.

Full-day workshops 9:00am to 4:30pm
AUD $870 per person

Strategic approaches to corruption prevention FULLY SUBSCRIBED

This workshop uncovers some of the reasons why corrupt conduct continues to occur despite considerable efforts to prevent it. This engaging workshop is underpinned by sound theoretical frameworks and includes case studies and practical activities. The workshops will assist executives and senior managers to make fuller use of the control inherent in well-designed and managed operational arrangements.

Facilitators:

Dr Benjamin Marx Senior Research and Prevention Officer, NSW Independent Commission Against Corruption

Adam Shapiro Senior Corruption Prevention Officer (Training and Development), NSW Independent Commission Against Corruption

Corruption prevention for planning professionals

This workshop will explore corrupt conduct in planning and development, and the potential opportunities for corrupt conduct in the design and management of planning systems. It will enhance participant abilities to recognise measures that planning professionals can implement to prevent corruption at both the individual and operational level. Planning professionals or those in related fields who work within urban and regional planning and development will benefit from attending the interactive workshop.

Facilitator:

Antony Pedroza Senior Corruption Prevention Officer (Planning), NSW Independent Commission Against Corruption

Effective complaint management

Managers and staff responsible for developing, managing, implementing or monitoring complaint handling policies and systems should attend this workshop, which will provide an overview of the essential elements for an effective complaint handling system. Participants will examine cultural and organisational issues relating to complaints, and learn how to use complaints to improve service delivery.

Facilitator:

Donald Sword Senior Trainer, NSW Ombudsman

Fact-finder – an introduction to conducting a fact-finding investigation (for non-investigators)

The Fact finder workshop will equip participants with the tools to plan, conduct, conclude and report on an internal investigation. This workshop has a practical focus but also reviews the principles that underpin investigations, including confidentiality and procedural fairness. Fact-finder has been designed for those who may be required to conduct an internal fact-finding investigation into a complaint or allegations of staff wrongdoing, including misconduct or corrupt conduct.

Facilitators:

Yenda Clifton Principal Lawyer, NSW Independent Commission Against Corruption

Michael Riashi Senior Investigator, NSW Independent Commission Against Corruption

Half-day workshops
AUD $540 per workshop/ AUD $870 for two half day workshops
Morning workshop
9:00am to 12:30pm
Afternoon workshop
1:00pm to 4:30pm

Using intelligence to guide corruption and misconduct investigations

This workshop will help participants to identify valuable sources of information to support corruption investigations. It will also explain the best ways to collect, collate, evaluate and analyse that information. Those who conduct corruption investigations, intelligence analysts and financial investigators will benefit by participating in this workshop.

Facilitators:

Marie Zitny Manager of Intelligence Corruption Operations, Crime and Corruption Commission, Queensland

Carol Morrison Intelligence Analyst, Crime and Corruption Commission, Queensland

Managing white collar and corrupt conduct targets: employing the five-stage grief model – from denial to acceptance

Investigators and prosecutors benefit when rightfully implicated white collar and corrupt conduct targets have truly accepted their circumstances and cooperate with the investigation. When faced with "losing everything", these targets often begin in denial, and then sabotage themselves, the investigation or legal proceedings until they reach the acceptance stage. In 1969, Dr Elizabeth Kübler Ross wrote On Death and Dying, which first described the five grief stages terminally ill patients work through as they progress from denial of their terminal diagnosis to acceptance of their fate. This workshop will map out the grief stages investigators and prosecutors can expect from white collar and corrupt conduct targets as they work through their way to acceptance. Participants will examine and discuss case studies to demonstrate practical and effective application of the theory.

Facilitator:

Special Agent George Bokelberg Federal Bureau of Investigation, New Orleans Division, United States of America


  • Strategic approaches to corruption prevention

    FULLY SUBSCRIBED

    Full-day workshop

    9:00 am to 4:30 pm

    Cost

    AUD $870

    Objective

    By completing this workshop, participants will be better equipped to:

    • understand the main elements of the control environment, their impacts on corruption and how they integrate
    • develop awareness of what may motivate corrupt conduct and how they can use motivation to create positive change
    • understand the corruption prevention implications of organisational structures and boundaries
    • comprehend the control inherent in tight operational arrangements, such as best practice processes and performance metrics
    • analyse operational arrangements for efficiency and effectiveness and identify points of weakness and opportunity for corruption.

    Content

    Public sector agencies have implemented a range of corruption prevention and risk management strategies with varying degrees of success. This course uncovers some of the reasons why corrupt conduct continues to occur despite considerable efforts to prevent it. View more.

    Weaknesses in operational arrangements and a failure to make proper use of the controls within well-designed and managed systems can create vulnerabilities and lead to corruption. Systems geared towards achieving operational outcomes in an efficient and effective manner have built into them a range of controls. These controls reduce the opportunity for unwanted and poor outcomes such as corruption. Systems geared towards operational outcomes also act on the drivers of appropriate and improper workplace behaviours and help to ensure that organisations get the best out of their staff.

    This workshop puts forward an approach to corruption prevention that builds on past successes in corruption risk management while making fuller use of the control achieved through well-designed and managed operational arrangements.

    The program includes content on the control implications of organisational structure and boundaries, information integrity, location of decision-making and accountabilities, process design, management arrangements, manager and staff capability and capacity, incentive structures, group norms, and equity and entitlement issues.

    Who will attend

    The workshop is for executives and senior managers who have operational responsibility for work areas that have significant risk for corruption.

    The workshop uncovers some of the reasons why corrupt conduct continues to occur despite considerable efforts to prevent it. The workshop will assist executives and senior managers to make fuller use of the control inherent in well-designed and managed operational arrangements. Sound theoretical frameworks, such as case studies and practical activities that challenge participants, underpin this engaging workshop.

    Participants will be able to apply the skills and concepts acquired on the course to the corruption risks identified. The program is suitable for senior managers in all three tiers of government.

    Facilitators

    Dr Benjamin Marx joined the NSW ICAC as a Senior Research and Prevention Officer in 2007. He has managed and led corruption prevention projects and research analysis on investigations.

    Mr Adam Shapiro is an adult educator with over 25 years’ experience. He has been working at the NSW ICAC as the Senior Project Officer, Training and Development, since 2008.


  • Corruption prevention for planning professionals

    Full-day workshop

    9:00 am to 4:30 pm

    Cost

    AUD $870

    Objective

    At the end of the workshop, participants will be better equipped to:

    • recognise the multiple opportunities for corruption in planning
    • understand the factors that motivate, allow, or encourage corrupt conduct in planning and development, including factors that are used to personally justify corrupt behaviours
    • understand the main elements of the corruption control environment, their impacts on corruption and their interactions
    • recognise measures that planning professionals can implement to prevent corruption at both the individual and operational level.

    Content

    This course will look beyond explaining corrupt conduct in specific planning and development investigations. It will explore issues surrounding awareness of corrupt conduct in planning and development and the potential opportunities for corrupt conduct in the design and management of planning systems. View more.

    This workshop examines strategic approaches to prevent corruption rather than focusing on further controlling individual behaviour. It examines other control elements, such as information integrity, process design and decision-making, and how they can be employed to reduce the vulnerability of planning and development systems to corruption.

    Who will attend

    The workshop is for planning professionals or those in related fields who work within urban and regional planning and development. The workshop is suitable for all planners and related professionals regardless of experience. It will particularly benefit those who have some seniority or management responsibilities.

    The workshop provides participants with an awareness of what corruption is and looks like in the context of planning and development. Using theoretical frameworks and case studies, the workshop explores how organisations involved in planning and development can use strategic approaches to prevent corruption. This workshop includes various activities to provide participants with practical measures to prevent corruption in planning and development.

    Facilitator

    Mr Antony Pedroza is a qualified planning professional with over 14 years of experience. He brings his planning experience and practical knowledge of working for councils and the NSW government to his current role at the NSW ICAC for both investigations and corruption prevention work.


  • Effective complaint management

    Full-day workshop

    9:00 am to 4:30 pm

    Cost

    AUD $870

    Objective

    By completing this workshop, participants will be better equipped to:

    • understand and identify a complaint
    • identify the skills participants already use for effective complaint management
    • examine an organisation’s complaints culture
    • implement the three tiers of effective complaint handling
    • understand the component of systems to support frontline complaint handling
    • understand the range of strategies to employ to deal with unreasonable conduct by complainants
    • understand the key elements of effective complaint handling policies and procedures
    • review their organisations complaint handling policies and procedures based on the Australian Standards in Complaint Handling
    • identify possible resolution options
    • understand the roles of external agencies.

    Content

    This workshop provides an overview of the essential elements for an effective complaint handling system.

    Using Australian Standards as a reference, participants are given guidance about what good complaint policies and systems should look like. Participants will examine cultural and organisational issues relating to complaints, and learn how to use complaints to improve service delivery. The workshop will also provide a summary of frontline complaint handling and strategies for managing unreasonable conduct by complainants. View more.

    Participants will receive a range of resources that provide guidance on the best practice principles of complaint management as outlined in the Australian and New Zealand Standard on complaint management in organisations. These resources aim to help agencies to understand what is involved in establishing a comprehensive and effective complaint management system.

    Who will attend

    Managers and staff responsible for developing, managing, implementing or monitoring complaint handling policies and systems.

    Facilitator

    Donald Sword is a senior trainer with the NSW Ombudsman. He delivers complaint handling and management training to state and federal government departments, universities and community service organisations.


  • Fact-finder – an introduction to conducting a fact-finding investigation (for non-investigators)

    Full-day workshop

    9:00 am to 4:30 pm

    Cost

    AUD $870

    Objective

    By completing this workshop, participants will be better equipped to:

    • understand the inquiry process and the role of the investigator
    • understand and apply the underlying principles of confidentiality and procedural fairness
    • develop a scope, purpose and fact-finding plan for an inquiry
    • understand the investigative interview process
    • collect and analyse information and evidence
    • test the reliability of evidence
    • make findings of fact leading to report recommendations
    • write an investigation report.

    Content

    This is an introductory workshop for those who may be required to conduct an internal fact-finding investigation into a complaint or allegations of staff wrongdoing, including misconduct or corrupt conduct. View more.

    The workshop has a practical focus and includes how to plan, conduct, conclude and report on an internal investigation. Participants will examine the principles that underpin investigations, including confidentiality and procedural fairness. Case studies and real examples enliven this interactive workshop and allow participants to think practically about the topics. The wealth of experience of the workshop facilitators brings a depth and strength to the workshop material.

    Who will attend

    This workshop provides a comprehensive introduction for personnel who may have to conduct fact-finding investigations. It is suitable for:

    • complaint handlers who want to develop their investigative capability
    • managers in state government and local councils who have limited experience in the inquiry process and may be asked to conduct an inquiry
    • human resource managers
    • administration managers
    • finance managers
    • internal auditors
    • audit committee members
    • public interest disclosures officers and coordinators.

    Facilitators

    Ms Yenda Clifton is a Principal Lawyer with the NSW ICAC. She has previously worked as a prosecutor with the NSW Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions and with the NSW Ombudsman as Principal Lawyer on the Operation Prospect investigation.

    Mr Michael Riashi is a Senior Investigator with the NSW ICAC. He leads investigations into allegations of serious and/or systemic corrupt conduct involving a broad range of criminal and disciplinary matters occurring within NSW public sector agencies.


  • Using intelligence to guide corruption and misconduct investigations

    Half-day workshop

    9:00 am to 12:30 pm

    Cost

    AUD $540

    If registering for two half-day workshops: AUD $870

    Objectives

    At the end of the workshop, participants will be better equipped to:

    • identify internal information sources
    • identify relevant open source information, including social networking sites and apply the intelligence cycle to this information
    • determine the difference between intelligence and evidence
    • understand and produce different intelligence products
    • use intelligence to guide and enhance investigative activity
    • build, maintain and share intelligence holdings
    • use intelligence to provide strategic advice
    • use intelligence for corruption prevention.

    Content

    When investigating allegations of corruption or misconduct, there is an abundance of intelligence available through an agency’s information holdings and public (open source) information that is often overlooked or under utilised. This workshop will assist participants to identify those sources of information and provide examples of methods available to collect, collate, evaluate and analyse information for use within an investigation. View more.

    This workshop will assist participants to identify valuable sources of information to support corruption/misconduct investigations. Participants will explore the avenues available to them to collect information and how to better collate, evaluate and analyse that information to guide and direct an investigation. The workshop is designed to enhance the skills of anyone who undertakes investigations in the workplace.

    Who will attend

    This is an introductory workshop for those who have limited experience in using intelligence information, tools and methodologies to assist with corruption and misconduct investigations.

    The workshop is for managers, investigators (including financial investigators) and corruption prevention advisers in state or Commonwealth government departments and local councils who conduct investigations into suspected corruption and/or misconduct with limited or no access to intelligence resources and intelligence staff.

    Facilitators

    Marie Zitny is the Manager of Intelligence for Corruption Operations at the Crime and Corruption Commission, Queensland. She has extensive experience in law enforcement as both an investigator and an intelligence analyst. She is a former police officer and has worked as a misconduct investigator in the private and public sectors.

    Carol Morrison is an intelligence analyst and specialises in the investigation of police corruption and misconduct. She has worked at the Crime and Corruption Commission for the past 10 years.


  • Managing white collar and corrupt conduct targets: employing the five-stage grief model – from denial to acceptance

    Half-day workshop

    1:00 pm to 4:30 pm

    Cost

    AUD $540

    If registering for two half-day workshops: AUD $870

    Objectives

    By completing this workshop, participants will be better equipped to:

    • identify which stages of “grief” investigation targets may be stuck in and the stages they still may need to work through
    • distinguish between unreality based bargaining and constructive negotiation
    • distinguish between the pseudo-acceptance of a target who will be a poor cooperator or witness, versus true acceptance
    • strategically facilitate a targets’ movement from denial to acceptance.

    Content

    Investigators and prosecutors benefit when rightfully implicated white collar and corrupt conduct targets have truly accepted their circumstances and cooperate with the investigation. When faced with "losing everything", these targets often begin in denial, and then sabotage themselves, the investigation or legal proceedings until they reach the acceptance stage. View more.

    In 1969, Dr Elizabeth Kübler Ross wrote On Death and Dying, which first described the five grief stages terminally ill patients work through as they progress from denial of their terminal diagnosis to acceptance of their fate. Mental health professionals with knowledge of this emotional progression are able to assist their terminally ill patients move from denial, where patients fail to address their current and future needs, through anger, bargaining, and depression, to finally reaching a more realistically based acceptance. At the acceptance stage, they can constructively address theirs and their loved ones’ needs, patients contribute to their own comfort and welfare, and put their affairs in order. This five-stage model of psychological progression can be generalised to understand and anticipate the experiences of anyone faced with the dawning awareness of catastrophic life changes that involve trauma and loss.

    This workshop will map out the grief stages investigators and prosecutors can expect from white collar and corrupt conduct targets as they work through their way to acceptance. Participants will examine and discuss case studies to demonstrate practical and effective application of the theory.

    Who will attend

    This workshop will be conducted for investigators, probation and pre-trial services officers, judicial officers and any others who work closely with white collar and corrupt conduct targets, from investigations through to sentencing and the appeals process.

    Facilitator

    Special Agent George Bokelberg is a clinical psychologist with a doctorate from the Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology at Rutgers University. He served for several years as the FBI undercover program’s chief psychologist at FBI Headquarters in Washington DC before transferring to the New Orleans branch.

Until the Conference!

Download the APSACC information brochure

Key Dates

  • Registration opensMonday 29 May 2017
  • Standard registration closes Monday 31 October 2017
  • Pre-conference workshops Tuesday 14 November 2017
  • Conference Wednesday 15 and Thursday 16 November 2017